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Queer Nerd with a Ukulele

Cricket. They/them/theirs pronouns. Transmasculine genderqueer white person studying environmental justice at a liberal arts college. This blog is mainly reblogs with occasional selfies and personal musings. Expect lots of trans and QUILTBAG things in general, environmental topics (especially food justice), and critical commentary on racism, ableism, and classism in a mainly U.S. context.
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Apr 23 '14
sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

Apr 23 '14

korpsekobain:

don’t hurt BEES. they just want to pollinate flowers and make honey. hurt WASP’s. fuck them and their old money, big mansions, and country clubs

Apr 23 '14
"Before Depo was approved in 1992, it was routinely used on Native women by IHS, particularly on Native women with disabilities. According to one area director Burton Attico, the Phoenix IHS had already begun to substitute Depo for sterilization on patients with mental disabilities in the 1980s because by then sterilization had been prohibited. Said Attico, “we used it to stop their periods. There is nothing else that will do it. To have to change a pad on someone developmentally disabled, you’ve got major problems. The fact that they become infertile while on it is a side benefit.” Raymond Jannett of the Phoenix IHS suggested that Depo-Provera aided young women in dealing with PMS-like symptoms. “Depo-Provery turned them back into their sweet, poor, handicapped selves. I take some pride in being a pioneer in that regard,” he said. But, while Jannett did not have any reservations about using it on Indian women, he did not plan to use it “on attractive 16-yer-old girls who one day hope to be mothers.” Patrick Gideon, with the IHS in Oklahoma City, said it would be appropriate to prescribe the drug to “women who are unable to care for themselves. For hygienic reasons, we will go ahead and give it.” Apparently, keeping Native women “clean” by sterilizing them is more important than protecting Native women’s health; in this way, Native women’s bodies are viewed as inherently dirty, in need fo cleansing and purification at any cost."

Andrea Smith, Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide

The intersection of racism and ableism …

(via thecurvature)

read so much andrea smith when i was researching forced sterilization of native women my sophomore year … highly recommended reading

(via femme-filipina)

Apr 22 '14
Apr 22 '14

Listen up!

thedisposablelover:

I tattoo professionally in Austin Texas. I will cover up racist and fascist tattoos free of charge for anyone who doesn’t believe in that shit. No questions no judgment no appointments needed. Spread the word and erase racism. Dallaserl@yahoo.com

#for a second i was like#why would you have those for any reason#and then i realized#some people get tattoos when they’re drunk#some people learn that they have been harmful and grow beyond it#i’m sure there are people who regret their dream catcher tattoos#tattoos

Apr 22 '14
"I’ve encountered people constantly assuming sex is good and that having sex is just something you do in healthy relationships. This creates a situation where hating sex is a character flaw caused by those terrible sex-negative tropes society presses on you, and obviously only Bad People don’t consent to sex.

That’s rape culture. This is what environments that assume sex is unambiguously a good thing do. Saying, “It’s consensual sex that’s good” doesn’t actually fix the problem. It just creates a situation where you must be consenting to sex, because if you aren’t, you’re not having enough sex and then you’re “sex-negative”.

See, it only fixes a problem where you’re like, “Well I don’t really want to do this right now”. It does not do anything at all to help people who find sex painful. It does nothing at all to help a person who doesn’t want sex, but thinks they do because it’s been so heavily normativized they have to have sex, and have to have it in this specific way. All the, “But make sure it’s consensual!” thing does is tells the person, “Well maybe if you don’t want sex this time it’s okay, but remember you still must be having it some of the time!”

See, to actually fight rape culture you need to say “Sex is always optional. You are never obligated to have sex.” You must always be concerned with consent, and that means you must accept that the answer may very well always be no, despite the fact there’s this belief sex is the greatest thing ever.

And if someone never wants sex, then sex can’t really be a good thing to them, because it’s always unwanted.
"

Sex Positivity is Rape Culture in Disguise (via youlittlearsonist)

Really like this. We need to find ways of transforming real sex positivity to promote choice in sex, not uncritically promote sex itself. (via swankivy)

This. All of this. (via elementalsight)

 (roachpatrol)

This is something that I really believe in and I dislike that “sex-positive” has such bad history and current problems as well. When I first learned about it, I really thought about it was focused on what this passage is describing, that it is okay to want sex and it is okay to not want sex. Hopefully, my followers know I am all for whatever a person is comfortable with.

(via foryoursexualinformation)

(Source: sissypunks)

Apr 21 '14

ravensmuse:

One of the things that a LOT of progressives have a problem with is classism. “DON’T SHOP AT WALMART! Buy local and organic!” etc. and they totally fail at realizing some people can’t afford other options, if they have options at all. Our struggles are different. Do what you can when you can. Raise awareness. But stop assuming everyone has the same opportunities and abilities.

Apr 21 '14

trangst:

without the internet i would have probably never identified as trans: true

without the internet i would probably have continued being completely uncomfortable with myself and having no idea why while lacking access to the resources or support systems which could have helped me figure my shit out: also true

Apr 21 '14

escapedgoat:

jayheartless:

When I was 15, and still pretty new to Canada and English terms, my boyfriend at the time told me he liked wife beaters, I side eyed him so hard & called him out on it, while he reassured me it was simply the name of the shirt. 

I’m glad I wasn’t the only one who noticed how fucked up the term is. 

I’ve always hated that shit. I grew up calling them tank tops or undershirts and will continue to do so

(Source: -teesa-)

Apr 20 '14

battered-hilt:

isyris:

alphaziraphale:

dude though not once in pacific rim do they mention the internet dying, so it’s safe to assume that the internet is still around when this is taking place just think about it

  • jaeger pilot fan blogs
  • selfies with dead kaiju ‘look at this piece of shit #byeju’
  • 'share to help people who's houses have been destroyed'
  • 'KAIJU ARE MISSUNDERSTOOD!!!! THEY JUST WANT TO BE FRIENDS BUT WE ARE KILLING THEM!!!!!!!! MY POOR BABIES I UNDERSTAND U!! <3<3'
  • kaiju memes
  • Change.org petitions to take the funding from the wall and give it to the jaeger programme
  • K A I J U   M E M E S
  • kaiju dildos
  • 16-year-olds on DeviantART going through their “edgy” phase with rainbow Kaiju fursonas
Apr 20 '14

redphilistine:

LGBT rights activism that ignores the fact that most victims of homophobia and transphobia are black and latino youth isn’t worth shit.

Apr 20 '14
"Women are told it is unfeminine and gross to have muscles and to cultivate strength, which in turn leads them to actively avoid doing things that will build muscles and strength, which then makes them even less capable of doing things that require strength, which the critics then use as proof of women’s inherent physical frailty. And so the cycle continues…"

Women’s difficulty with pull-ups is about more than biology | Fit and Feminist (via rememo)

And I always want to point out here: women, on average, possess more lower-body strength, while men, on average, possess more upper-body strength. There’s a lot of overlap and it isn’t always individually applicable, but that’s the generalization, averaging across the population.

But we SOCIALLY value upper-body strength, and upper-body muscles. So we construct women as weaker, because we refuse to measure them on the body parts where they may be stronger, we devalue those.

Lifting is mostly done with the legs. So women may be as good or better at heavy lifting as men. But we socially construct lifting as having to do with large, muscular arms and chests. You don’t really need powerful arms and chests to lift—you need powerful thighs, otherwise you’re gonna throw your back out. We actually lie about what makes a person strong and capable to favor men.

Push-up and pull-ups are upper-body strength exercises. So they’re socially valued. The military doesn’t tell you to do 20 squats as penance. No one is fucking impressed by all the squats you can do. Squats just sound stupid, hah, squats. We laugh at them because women might be better at them than men, on average. They’re worthless.

(via iknewiwouldregretthis)

This stuff plays into all sorts of other body image problems, too. The body weight that’s regarded as ideal for women, for example, is really only achievable for individuals suffering from mild to moderate muscular atrophy. You literally can’t get there just by shedding fat - you also have to let your muscles waste away. We actually regard it as “normal” for a woman to be suffering from muscular atrophy.

(via dancing-painted-bears)

Apr 19 '14

antfucker98:

the harmful trans agenda. with such ideals as ‘using the bathroom’ and ‘being respected as a human’

Apr 19 '14

Queerability 2014 Statement About Autism Speaks

queerability:

Queerability condemns Autism Speaks, the largest autism organization in the USA. Autism Speaks regularly excludes autistic people from decision-making positions, spends a disproportionate amount of their funds on research that seeks to eradicate autism thus eradicate autistic people and executive’s salaries while giving very little back to the autism community, actively silences autistic people from speaking out against them, and steals the work of autistic people. Autism Speaks also discusses autistic people as tragedies and burdens on families. 

Autism Speaks regularly excludes autistic people in decision making positions. John Elder Robinson, a former member of Autism Speak’s science advisory board and the only autistic member of the board, stepped down from the advisory board in protest of Suzanne Wright’s "Call to Action" in November. Autism Speaks still has no autistic people on their board of directors

Autism Speaks spends a disproportionate amount of their funds research that seeks to eradicate autism thus eradicate autistic people and executive’s salaries while giving very little back to the autism community. Autism Speaks gives 4 cents out of every dollar raised back to the autism community and pays extravagant salaries for executives.  

Autism Speaks actively silences autistic people from speaking out against them. Queerability’s own Kristen Guin was blocked from posting on the Autism Speaks Facebook page via her personal Facebook page and theQueerability Facebook page

Autism Speaks steals the work of autistic people. Autism Speaks stole the work of notable Autistic activist, Kassiane Sibley

Autism Speaks also discusses autistic people as tragedies and burdens on families. In their films, "Autism Every Day" and "I Am Autism", they use fear-mongering language and treat autistic people as burdens.

Apr 19 '14

ninetndo:

Whats going on tumblr did u kno

  • nonbinary dmab ppl exist

(Source: dkctf)