Queer Nerd with a Ukulele

Cricket. They/them/theirs pronouns. Transmasculine genderqueer white person studying environmental justice at a liberal arts college. This blog is mainly reblogs with occasional selfies and personal musings. Expect lots of trans and QUILTBAG things in general, environmental topics (especially food justice), and critical commentary on racism, ableism, and classism in a mainly U.S. context. I also post occasional cute animals, Harry Potter fandom things, and cool embroidery when I need a pick-me-up.

loverofstories:

WIWT: Breaking up the blue monochrome with a simple pattern and textured tie.

(via heyho-lezgo)

princess-passion-flower:

seafoamtides:

kateoplis:

Mexico CitySex workers gather to commemorate their colleagues who were violently murdered, two days before the Day of the Dead festival.

this is why you don’t fuck around with day of the dead, because it has a deeper meaning than “pretty sugar skulls”. those are offerings to the dead, a symbol of each and every person we choose to honor in the afterlife; not some quirky costume to put on and appropriate. those skulls mean something, the pan de muertos and altars mean something. so go fuck yourself if you think that they’re just for decoration while you shit on my ancestors for you stupid pasty ass bland halloween party.

And lets also remember sex workers who are not protected and their fight as feminism glosses over them and shame them

(via lishurdtongue)

Coercion is when you make the consequences to saying “no” to intimacy so great that it removes any reasonable choice. There is more obvious coercion, such as threats, either externally or internally directed. But I find that coercion just sort of organically arises when you believe that your partner, in that moment, owes you intimacy. If you think your partner owes you intimacy, and you are just “expressing your feelings,” there’s a good chance you’re being coercive. If your partner says “no,” and you start preparing for a fight instead of accepting their choice, you’re probably going to be coercive.

tonidorsay:

perseidbadger:

bidyke:

yilduza:

I love the “BI AND LARGE” sign!

If there’s one thing you need to know about bisexuals it’s that we are all hilarious and incapable of resisting bi-related puns.

This is true.

(via heavymuffintop)

With iOS 8 law enforcement can now control your phone and prevent you from taking photos, videos and recordings of officers when they are near. The apps will be disabled within a certain radius. Capturing any police brutality is now prohibited.

Apple employee who demands to remain anonymous

Sept. 17, 2014

(via negrophiliac)

Apple holds a patent which mentions that its technology could have applications for law enforcement and government security. For example, the patent description notes that covert ‘police or government operations may require complete ‘blackout’ conditions’.

(via priceofliberty)

Here’s a little more on that patent: Business Insider 

(via glitterarygetsit)

(via glitterarygetsit)

jean-grey-o-lantern:

So last night cops arrested 7 protesters, then turned to the rest of the protesters and told them “we’ll release them without bond if you leave (stop protesting)”

They literally turned their own dubiously legal arrests into a hostage situation. They took hostages. Ferguson PD is a terrorist organization and they aren’t even trying to hide that fact any more.

Look at this

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You can donate to protesters’ legal defense and bail here

(via lunarphases)

weneeddiversebooks:

Writer/Illustrator/Graphic Novelist MariNaomi discusses writing people of color and her experiences as a person of one race writing about others. Thanks, Mari for sharing!

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I don't have a problem w/strippers and if u wanna sell ur body to gross men that's ur choice BUT pole dancing isn't stripping, pole takes ATHLETIC SKILL, im not just shakin my ass n picking up two-dollar bills w/my vagina. just because I pole dance 4 fitness and 2 express myself creatively doesn't mean i want ppl to assume i'm a trashy bimbo w/daddy issues.
beatingthebinary beatingthebinary Said:

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

Wow! You packed so much in here.

First of all, I’m not selling my body to gross old men.

There’s a few misconceptions in that one sentence alone. You may have noticed I’m home in my bathrobe, alone with my dogs, having finished my gyro, answering this. How did I get my body back?! Did I buy it back? Doesn’t that defeat the purpose of selling it? Maybe he GAVE it back to me out of charity when he was done using it, is that it?

So —taking this ask at face value—i’m gonna say your feminist praxis needs a bit of a refresher. Women—all women, and tbh all people as little as I care for men—are living beings with agency and calculating capabilities. We calculate our best options and go from there. We are not tissues to be used, regardless of that fervid and foetid radfem rhetoric. They only regard certain women as people anyway.

And then, if you’re talking to me, you know my stance on pole dancing. You know that western appropriation narratives aside, the reason you want pole dance specifically to be your fitness routine and not mallakhamb (which doesn’t welcome women anyway) or aerialism, is that neither have been sexy and appealing background props setting the standards of female desirability for the past twenty years.

Strippers have.

You want to look like a stripper. You want that slumming, dangerous, mysterious aura, you want to walk with confidence like I walk in 8” heels, you want to look like men pay you hundreds of dollars because you’re desirable.

You want to feel edgy and desirable.

That’s why you haven’t run off to cirque du soleil, nor are you calling aerialists tramps.

With that cleared up, let’s go back to your first point:

You do have a problem with strippers. Your problem: you want our aura and desirability and not the stigma, not the danger, not the real threat of losing homes/jobs/family/scholarships/children/careers/futures.

You know that the edginess you crave comes at a price, and your way of dealing with this is NOT to combat stripper stigma, your way of dealing with this is to play up respectability politics for all you’re worth, widening the dichotomy between pure you and filthy us, too busy selling our bodies to dirty old men to develop the skills and grace you so admire.

And to a certain degree this makes sense. It will work for you, sort of. There are people who will buy it, mostly other women who have the same investment in maintaining respectability politics.

Men, babe, are never going to believe you, and they are never going to care.

BUT! There’s another option. Instead of crying when someone asks if you’re a stripper after a certain effortfull routine, sobbing like strippers can’t climb a pole through shoulder mounts backward and then do a drop in a straddle split catching themselves an inch above the floor in 8” heels, instead of reassuring yourself that we’re all mushy muscles barely able to stagger around the pole, making your tricks all the more unique and special—

The next time someone asks if you’re a stripper you could say:

No! But isn’t it amazing that they manage to do this in heels?

No, I’m not a stripper, but I’m flattered you think I have that self confidence!

No, I’m not a stripper but I’ve thought about it, but the stigma scares me.

No, I’m not a stripper but their skills and bravery inspire me and my classmates!

No, I’m not a stripper, and it makes me nervous that you would ask that bc sex work is so loaded and sex workers are murdered and discriminated against, so I get defensive about this but I’m trying to fight it and support strippers in ending sex worker stigma, starting with myself.

No, I’m not a stripper and I get tense about that question because of daddy issues stereotypes but isn’t it so fucked up that strippers (and other women) are the butt of jokes about male pattern abuse? 1 in 3 or 4 women is abused in her life time, usually by a family member or an intimate partner. You know someone who is the butt of that joke, stripper or not. And issues are a valid response to abuse across the spectrum, not just for strippers.

No, I’m not a stripper but I love them and I’m jealous they get to wear fancy outfits.

No, I’m not a stripper because they’re an exploited labour class and i enjoy my pole work best without having to give a percent of my income to a man who doesn’t deserve it.

No, I’m not a stripper, and they don’t pick up dollars with their vaginas either because unlike customers (who stick dollars in their mouths) none of us are interested in getting hepatitis.

So these are some potential answers for you! Hope this helps and thanks for indulging me.

Love, your friend,

Red💋

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weareallmixedup:

daughtersofdig:

Since 1980, 3000 native Canadian women have been murdered/gone missing. Indigenous women are five times more likely than other women to die as a result of violence. Sixty percent of known perpetrators are white men.

Justice for all Indigenous Women! by Jessica Sabogal | Montréal

1 in 3 Native American women are raped within their lifetime, and are at extreme risk of violence from non-native (white) men. x x x

Despite push from the UN for a national inquiry, Canada continues to largely ignore the violence against Native Women. x

(via queeroticomics)

remikanazi:

It’s essential that we critique a sexist, misogynistic, racist, hyper-violent society without stigmatizing millions of people with mental health issues.

(via just-another-nerd37)

iwriteaboutfeminism:

A weird negotiation process happening with police tonight.

September 28th

(via creppysong)

shutl0w:

did some good tweets today i think

(via quantumspork)

zouisgate:

there is a very good compilation of gender neutral pronouns in a variety of different languages that can be found here! it’s really helpful and a lot of thought and help has gone into it from people who speak these as their native language! i definitely recommend you go check it out

(via creppysong)

ethiopienne:

We Read Too is a book resource app created by Kaya Thomas (@kthomas901) that includes over 300 Children’s and YA books written by authors of color featuring characters of color. You can browse, search, view the details of every book as well as suggest any books that should be added in the app. This resource is for all people of color who have felt misrepresented or forgotten when finding books to read.

Help the app grow by downloading it for free here (http://bit.ly/1mUfe2F), rating and reviewing the app, and suggesting new books & genres that should be included! Follow @WeReadTooApp on twitter and like Facebook page at facebook.com/WeReadTooApp for updates. 

(via queeroticomics)